Maxine - 'On my Door Step'

 ‘On My Door Step’

The Grand Union Canal

We moved to Milton Keynes in 2012 having lived in the suburbs of London all our lives.  It was a need to escape our stressful lives along with the wish to be closer to our daughter and her family, which was the impetus for change.  So, after much deliberation we bit the bullet and bought a small business, diving in head first with only a wish to come up “swimming”.

 Before the move we knew very little about  Milton Keynes other than its famous concrete cows, so it was a complete surprise to us to learn of its numerous lakes and waterways that stretch along the towns expanse, and the Grand Union Canal that runs along the northern and eastern fringes of the town.

A view of The Grand Union Canal

The over-riding factor that attracted us to our current home was the beautiful location.  Just a few steps away from our front door, lies the towpath of the Grand Union Canal. This stretch of water has become an integral part of our lives, a daily routine and enjoyable ritual walking with our dog Bonnie that is seldom missed.  The Grand Union Canal links London to Birmingham, passing through rolling country side, towns and peaceful villages. It’s the longest British waterway, and an echo of our industrial past which has now been turned over to leisure.  It surprised us to discover that water is such a huge part of life in Milton Keynes, with its 400 acres of lakes giving it more shoreline than Jersey. Much of Milton Keynes landscape has been thoughtfully developed and well cared for by The Parks Trust; who attends the 400-acres of lakes, 80 miles of roads and its numerous grass verges, along with its three ancient woodlands.

Mother duck with ducklingThere’s something indescribable about the canals meandering beauty which provides a space for reflection, a sense of tranquility, and which provides a start and end point to our working day. On the canal there is always something new to observe;  Whether it’s watching a family of swans glide across the water or catching a glimpse of an eagle eyed heron, or seeing the descending Autumnal mist that brings a serenity to the world.

Eagle eye Heron

Another unexpected gift is; it’s a venue for social interaction; a meet and greet. Whether it’s a nod and a few words with a solitary fisherman, or a customary wave “hello” to the Skipper of a chugging narrow boat or a shared ‘doggie story’ with a fellow dog walker, gives a valuable insight into our local community, these  shared small pleasures which are so enlightening.

A Narrow Boat

Skipper of a Norrow Boat

I like to think that time is like the canal; you can’t stop it, you can’t slow it. You’ve just got to enjoy the ride.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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‘On My Door Step’

We moved to Milton Keynes in 2012 having lived in the suburbs of London all our lives.

It was a need to change our stressful lives along with the  wish to be nearer to our daughter and her family  that was the impetus for the move so we bit the bullet, brought a small business and dived in head first with the real hope we’d come up swimming.

 

Before our move we knew little about Milton Keynes other than its famous concrete cows so, it was a complete surprise to learn of the towns and the Grand Union Canal which, stretch along the northern and eastern fringes of the city.

 

What attacked us to our present home was this beautiful location. A few steps away from our front door and you step on the towpath of the Grand Union Canal. This takes me on my daily   walks with our dog Bonnie, a daily routine and ritual that I seldom miss.

 

The Grand Union Canal links London to Birmingham, passing through rolling countryside, towns and peaceful villages. It’s the longest British waterway, and an echo of our industrial past now turned over to leisure.  When we moved we discovered water is a huge part of life in Milton Keynes, with its 400 acres of lakes giving it more shoreline than Jersey. Much of the landscape thoughtfully developed and cared for by the Parks Trust who attends; its 400-acres of lakes,

80 miles of roads numerous grass verges and its three ancient woodlands

 

There’s something indescribable about the local canals meandering beauty which provides me with space for reflection, a time for tranquility. It’s a beautiful way of seeing things slowly, a starting point, and an end to the day. There is always something new for me to observe, whether it’s watching a family of swans or catching a glimpse of a eagle eyed heron or observing the descent of the Autumnal mist that always brings me a sense of calm a serenity to my world.

 

The canal also provides me with a venue for social interaction; a meet and greet, a passing nod or brief verbal exchange with a solitary fisherman or a customary wave to the Skipper of a chugging narrow boat, a shared ‘doggie story’ with a friendly fellow dog walker and valuable insight into local community news and shared small pleasures which is so enlightening in many ways. I like to think that time is like the canal; you can’t stop it, you can’t slow it. You’ve just got to enjoy the ride.

 

 

 

 

.[3]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘On My Door Step’

We moved to Milton Keynes in 2012 having lived in the suburbs of London all our lives.

It was a need to change our stressful lives along with the  wish to be nearer to our daughter and her family  that was the impetus for the move so we bit the bullet, brought a small business and dived in head first with the real hope we’d come up swimming.

 

Before our move we knew little about Milton Keynes other than its famous concrete cows so, it was a complete surprise to learn of the towns and the Grand Union Canal which, stretch along the northern and eastern fringes of the city.

 

What attacked us to our present home was this beautiful location. A few steps away from our front door and you step on the towpath of the Grand Union Canal. This takes me on my daily   walks with our dog Bonnie, a daily routine and ritual that I seldom miss.

 

The Grand Union Canal links London to Birmingham, passing through rolling countryside, towns and peaceful villages. It’s the longest British waterway, and an echo of our industrial past now turned over to leisure.  When we moved we discovered water is a huge part of life in Milton Keynes, with its 400 acres of lakes giving it more shoreline than Jersey. Much of the landscape thoughtfully developed and cared for by the Parks Trust who attends; its 400-acres of lakes,

80 miles of roads numerous grass verges and its three ancient woodlands

 

There’s something indescribable about the local canals meandering beauty which provides me with space for reflection, a time for tranquility. It’s a beautiful way of seeing things slowly, a starting point, and an end to the day. There is always something new for me to observe, whether it’s watching a family of swans or catching a glimpse of a eagle eyed heron or observing the descent of the Autumnal mist that always brings me a sense of calm a serenity to my world.

 

The canal also provides me with a venue for social interaction; a meet and greet, a passing nod or brief verbal exchange with a solitary fisherman or a customary wave to the Skipper of a chugging narrow boat, a shared ‘doggie story’ with a friendly fellow dog walker and valuable insight into local community news and shared small pleasures which is so enlightening in many ways. I like to think that time is like the canal; you can’t stop it, you can’t slow it. You’ve just got to enjoy the ride.

 

 

 

 

.[3]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘On My Door Step’

We moved to Milton Keynes in 2012 having lived in the suburbs of London all our lives.

It was a need to change our stressful lives along with the  wish to be nearer to our daughter and her family  that was the impetus for the move so we bit the bullet, brought a small business and dived in head first with the real hope we’d come up swimming.

 

Before our move we knew little about Milton Keynes other than its famous concrete cows so, it was a complete surprise to learn of the towns and the Grand Union Canal which, stretch along the northern and eastern fringes of the city.

 

What attacked us to our present home was this beautiful location. A few steps away from our front door and you step on the towpath of the Grand Union Canal. This takes me on my daily   walks with our dog Bonnie, a daily routine and ritual that I seldom miss.

 

The Grand Union Canal links London to Birmingham, passing through rolling countryside, towns and peaceful villages. It’s the longest British waterway, and an echo of our industrial past now turned over to leisure.  When we moved we discovered water is a huge part of life in Milton Keynes, with its 400 acres of lakes giving it more shoreline than Jersey. Much of the landscape thoughtfully developed and cared for by the Parks Trust who attends; its 400-acres of lakes,

80 miles of roads numerous grass verges and its three ancient woodlands

 

There’s something indescribable about the local canals meandering beauty which provides me with space for reflection, a time for tranquility. It’s a beautiful way of seeing things slowly, a starting point, and an end to the day. There is always something new for me to observe, whether it’s watching a family of swans or catching a glimpse of a eagle eyed heron or observing the descent of the Autumnal mist that always brings me a sense of calm a serenity to my world.

 

The canal also provides me with a venue for social interaction; a meet and greet, a passing nod or brief verbal exchange with a solitary fisherman or a customary wave to the Skipper of a chugging narrow boat, a shared ‘doggie story’ with a friendly fellow dog walker and valuable insight into local community news and shared small pleasures which is so enlightening in many ways. I like to think that time is like the canal; you can’t stop it, you can’t slow it. You’ve just got to enjoy the ride.

 

 

 

 

.[3]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

long with the  wish to be nearer to our daughter and her family  that was the impetus for the move so we bit the bullet, brought a small business and dived in head first with the real hope we’d come up swimming.

 

Before our move we knew little about Milton Keynes other than its famous concrete cows so, it was a complete surprise to learn of the towns and the Grand Union Canal which, stretch along the northern and eastern fringes of the city.

 

What attacked us to our present home was this beautiful location. A few steps away from our front door and you step on the towpath of the Grand Union Canal. This takes me on my daily   walks with our dog Bonnie, a daily routine and ritual that I seldom miss.

 

The Grand Union Canal links London to Birmingham, passing through rolling countryside, towns and peaceful villages. It’s the longest British waterway, and an echo of our industrial past now turned over to leisure.  When we moved we discovered water is a huge part of life in Milton Keynes, with its 400 acres of lakes giving it more shoreline than Jersey. Much of the landscape thoughtfully developed and cared for by the Parks Trust who attends; its 400-acres of lakes,

80 miles of roads numerous grass verges and its three ancient woodlands

 

There’s something indescribable about the local canals meandering beauty which provides me with space for reflection, a time for tranquility. It’s a beautiful way of seeing things slowly, a starting point, and an end to the day. There is always something new for me to observe, whether it’s watching a family of swans or catching a glimpse of a eagle eyed heron or observing the descent of the Autumnal mist that always brings me a sense of calm a serenity to my world.

 

The canal also provides me with a venue for social interaction; a meet and greet, a passing nod or brief verbal exchange with a solitary fisherman or a customary wave to the Skipper of a chugging narrow boat, a shared ‘doggie story’ with a friendly fellow dog walker and valuable insight into local community news and shared small pleasures which is so enlightening in many ways. I like to think that time is like the canal; you can’t stop it, you can’t slow it. You’ve just got to enjoy the ride.

 

 

 

 

.[3]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘On My Door Step’

We moved to Milton Keynes in 2012 having lived in the suburbs of London all our lives.

It was a need to change our stressful lives along with the  wish to be nearer to our daughter and her family  that was the impetus for the move so we bit the bullet, brought a small business and dived in head first with the real hope we’d come up swimming.

 

Before our move we knew little about Milton Keynes other than its famous concrete cows so, it was a complete surprise to learn of the towns and the Grand Union Canal which, stretch along the northern and eastern fringes of the city.

 

What attacked us to our present home was this beautiful location. A few steps away from our front door and you step on the towpath of the Grand Union Canal. This takes me on my daily   walks with our dog Bonnie, a daily routine and ritual that I seldom miss.

 

The Grand Union Canal links London to Birmingham, passing through rolling countryside, towns and peaceful villages. It’s the longest British waterway, and an echo of our industrial past now turned over to leisure.  When we moved we discovered water is a huge part of life in Milton Keynes, with its 400 acres of lakes giving it more shoreline than Jersey. Much of the landscape thoughtfully developed and cared for by the Parks Trust who attends; its 400-acres of lakes,

80 miles of roads numerous grass verges and its three ancient woodlands

 

There’s something indescribable about the local canals meandering beauty which provides me with space for reflection, a time for tranquility. It’s a beautiful way of seeing things slowly, a starting point, and an end to the day. There is always something new for me to observe, whether it’s watching a family of swans or catching a glimpse of a eagle eyed heron or observing the descent of the Autumnal mist that always brings me a sense of calm a serenity to my world.

 

The canal also provides me with a venue for social interaction; a meet and greet, a passing nod or brief verbal exchange with a solitary fisherman or a customary wave to the Skipper of a chugging narrow boat, a shared ‘doggie story’ with a friendly fellow dog walker and valuable insight into local community news and shared small pleasures which is so enlightening in many ways. I like to think that time is like the canal; you can’t stop it, you can’t slow it. You’ve just got to enjoy the ride.

 

 

 

 

.[3]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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